Wild Art

WildArtErstwhile MoMA curator Joachim Pissarro and art historian David Carrier are the authors of Wild Art, a stunning collection of 400 quirky and unorthodox artworks by international artists, published by Phaidon Press. In association with Thompson Hotels, the publishing house celebrated the book’s release at Teddy’s inside the Hollywood Roosevelt Tuesday, November 12, with LA artists whose works are featured in the book, including Drew Brophy, Yaya Chou, and The Elephant Art Gallery. Phaidon was kind enough to give us a peek inside Wild Art, along with excerpts about each work of art. Enjoy!

 

Wild Art
Anarchy in the UK was created by graffiti artist Tilt…on a brick wall in London in 2012. The work measures an impressive 10 x 22 m (33 x 72 ft). In 2012, thanks to the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the London Olympic Games, the Union Flag was highly visible and widely utilized in all forms of art, both established and wild.”

 

Wild Art
“Some pavement art depicts scenes inspired by Classical painting styles while some, such as this three-dimensional image from the street festival of Chiangmai, Thailand, presents images that are more reminiscent of the work of pop artists. Here. the green and white pill, seemingly floating above the lips, appears ready to be swallowed!”

 

Wild Art
“In the vicinity of the well-polished Chelsea art galleries of Manhattan, a movable museum such as the Marco art truck is an eye-stopper. Created by a wild artist, this former bread truck was transformed into a four-wheeled art store. ‘There are so many food trucks around now, so I thought I would riff off that,’ said Marco, 42, from inside his truck, here parked in the Tribeca area of Manhattan. ‘You order the burger; the guy makes the burger. You order the art; I make the art.'”

 

Wild Art
“Stelarc…is also known for his flesh hook suspension rituals, such as this one, Rock Suspension (Tokyo, 1980), from the very early days of his career as a performance artist.”

 

Wild Art
“Just like mainstream artists, wild artists can present us with a philosophical conundrum. Kyle Bean’s What Came First? is a sculpture of a chicken made from eggshells. As Bean explains, ‘My new project is a funny take on the well-known saying. I thought it would be a nice ironic twist to actually make a chicken from eggs. It has taken a couple of failed attempts and I have eaten quite a few poached eggs and omelets in the last couple of weeks, but I have finally finished the sculpture.'”

 

Wild Art
“Norma ‘Duffy’ Lyon (1929-2011) was an Iowa-based artist who sculpted butter, as in this rendering of The Last Supper, showing the artist herself at the head of the table. A regular fixture at the Iowa State Fair, she also created private commissions for celebrities and politicians. Lyon used to run a dairy farm with her husband in Toledo, Iowa, which provided the initial context for her highly skilled experiments with creating creamy artworks.”

 

Wild Art
“The Japanese artist Haroshi is a passionate skater and, hesitant to throw away cracked skateboard decks, he began to make wooden mosaics from the compressed boards. His art practice has expanded to large-scale sculptures, such as this 2011 hammerhead shark, measuring approximately 1.5 m (5 ft) and made entirely from the discards of his skate practice. Interestingly, the layering method that Haroshi uses to create sculpture from these processed products is exactly the same as that used to create traditional wooden Japanese sculptures of the Buddha.”

 

Wild Art
“The Longaberger Basket Company building in Newark, Ohio, is the office complex for a basket-making enterprise. Designed by the company this 16,723 [sq] meter (180,000 sq ft) building presents itself as the company’s own signature: a gigantic basket.”

 

Wild Art
“In La Orotava, Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, sand carpets and frescoes illustrating scenes from the Bible are made every June for Corpus Christi festival. In 2011 the theme was Dios noose entrega a su hijo Jesus (God gives us his son Jesus).”

 

Wild Art
“In Sofia, Bulgaria, this Soviet-era monument to the Second World War attracted new-found attention when an anonymous street artist spray-painted the soldier figures to resemble a legion of mythological American icons: comic-book characters or pop culture effigies ranging from Santa Claus to Ronald McDonald and Superman. The artist seems to have intended to ‘update’ this war monument to reflect Bulgaria’s current capitalist obsessions, as his slogan below reads, ‘In Step With The Times.’ It is interesting to note the political charge of this impressive work, which demonstrates how graffiti can be used across the world to deliver caustic, bitter messages against ruling systems. In this instance, a sophisticated public intervention conveys that there in not an exit out of the Americanization of world culture, suggesting that the real victors of Stalingrad in December 1942 were not the Soviet Red Army, but a band of characters whose existence is the product of American dreams and fantasies.”